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Back to basics marketing: or the controversial truth about being everything, everywhere

Back to basics marketing: or the controversial truth about being everything, everywhere

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Back to basics marketing: or the controversial truth about being everything, everywhere

When it comes to marketing, it’s easy to assume that being loud and busy wins. If you’re unavoidable, you’re unstoppable. While there is something in that, it requires resource, planning and budget. It also needs a harmonised approach to cross-functional teams. And let’s face it, we’re not all at that level, especially at present time.

So, what can you do? And, how can you maximise your voice when you don’t have the resource? It’s time to examine: why back to basics marketing trumps an everything, everywhere attitude!

A clear marketing plan is your superpower

Knowing exactly where you stand, what you want to achieve, and how to bridge the gap between them, is the first step. Most of the time though, a clear marketing plan gets forgotten or ignored because it can take time.

How to go back to basics with your marketing plan

By setting aside time to work on this, you’re doing yourself and your business a huge service. Although there are many jobs to get done, it comes down to time management and prioritisation.

Time management matrix

If you don’t have a marketing plan, there’s a good case for assigning it to Q1: Important and Urgent. If it needs updating, we’d still recommend Q1 but it’s less urgent depending on the content.

On the whole, it’s important to remember that your marketing plan should drive everything you do. It sets what success looks like, how to measure it and how to get there, therefore what activities to focus on.

How your personas impact your focus

By knowing about your ideal customer you’re in a stronger position to design your brand identity. This informs everything from the colours you use, to tone of voice, your digital focus and so much more.

Combining your marketing plan and your personas, your strategy should be solid. Your marketing plan sets out what to do, but your personas provide that crucial customer lens.

This unique insight comes from your campaigns, social media and feedback. From here, you can make educated decisions about where where to focus your time. You can even specify things like social media channels and content types.

Your website is the centre of your business

It seems so obvious to even write, yet there are still many websites that don’t pull their weight. These days, having a clear digital strategy is crucial to the success of most companies. Of course, there will be some exceptions, but generally it’s common sense.

It used to be that websites were the shop window to your business. It has developed a lot over the past few years. Now your website can be your best performing salesperson, who is there for your customers 24/7, year round.

Stripping your website back to the basics: what is your user journey?

By having a clear idea of what you want visitors to do on your website, you can set goals. You can also tailor the flow and type of content you produce. It also enables you to design your KPIs and track the success of your website.

Is it time to update your website?

To make sure you’re operating a well-oiled machine, there are three core areas to assess:

  1. web traffic
  2. user journey
  3. user experience

If you’re getting good quality traffic and converting leads, your website is likely to be in good condition. If you’re struggling with high bounce rates and low conversions, it’s time to consider upgrading.

A simple website structure with a proper content strategy is the best way to helping you stay on track and maintain your website. By knowing exactly what’s where and how it flows together into a journey makes all the difference.

Social media: and why you don’t need to be everything to everyone

Here’s the main culprit for an everything, everywhere attitude. And possibly the easiest one to remedy. There are a few things to think about:

  • do you have the resource to consistently post on all the channels you’re using?
  • is your content resonating across all platforms? (e.g. post engagement, web traffic)
  • are you reaching your personas?

Of course, you might answer ‘yes’ to some or all and still need to strip back to basic marketing for social media. Make sure you’re reflecting your social media strategy and tracking your performance.

We often say to clients that it’s better to serve one social media channel well, than many subpar. What we mean by this is not only posting content, but engaging with your community. That could be through user generated content, responding to comments, customer service enquiries.

Quick wins: PPC

When you have the basics covered running properly planned PPC campaigns are ideal. But did you know Google grades your quality score on the quality of your landing page?

That means it’s crucial to have your website content in good condition first.

Quality score

This metric often confuses marketers are it’s not quite as cut and dry as the rest. Google essentially scores your ad content and how relevant it appears to be based on your CTR and landing page experience.

According to Search Engine Journal:

Google improved how Quality Score is reported in Google Ads in 2017, but it still comes down to this simple fact:

– A good Quality Score (between 7 and 10) means you pay less money to advertise with Google Ads.

– A bad Quality Score (6 or lower) means you pay more money.

Need help?

It may seem a strange concept to want help in stripping back to basic marketing. You might even still feel resistant to the idea of simplifying things. Much like how a fresh pair of eyes often solves a Word Search, they can also help pinpoint what needs to change.

Whether you need a spare pair of eyes, extra resource or someone with a very specific set of skills (sorry, Liam Neeson’s all booked up), we can help! Fill out the form below and we will be in touch for a chat.

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digital transformation vs digitisation

Digital transformation v. Digitisation

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Digital transformation v. Digitisation

There are many, many buzzwords bandied about since the beginning of the pandemic. Furlough. Social distancing. Remote offices. COVID secure. Many businesses were forced to accept that having their teams work from home was a sink or swim moment. It was a time to rethink WFH as a privilege only for senior staff or exceptional circumstances. Above all though, it was crunch time. Put bluntly, if you couldn’t work from home, you were on “furloughed”… which is not ideal for anyone involved.

Out of this, a lot of people have been talking about digital transformation (again). It sounds pretty cool and sophisticated. And it is. But what many of them were actually discussing was digitisation. Hey, no shame in not knowing these are two different things, so long as you take time to learn the difference.

Let’s have a look at what they both mean, entail and how to establish where you are and what your next steps should be.

What does digital transformation mean?

Contrary to popular belief, digital transformation is less about technology and more about people. You can pretty much buy any technology, but your ability to adapt to an even more digital future depends on developing the next generation of skills, closing the gap between talent supply and demand, and future-proofing your own and others’ potential.

So really, digital transformation is a state of mind and a way of working. But not just as a team, on an organisational level. It’s a holistic approach. Driven by leaders and championed by everyone from newbies to the old school. It is about learning and knowledge transfer. Ultimately, something that helps everyone by encouraging synergy.

Yes, this is flirted with in some ways in the new push for remote working capabilities. However it isn’t even the tip of the iceberg.

OK, so what is ‘digitisation’?

Digitisation is most often mistaken for transformation.  The process of taking existing processes and digitising it is an important first step. It’s not, however transformational.  We’ve been using technology to improve existing physical and intellectual processes since the industrial revolution.  Customers expect businesses to have websites, apps and social channels and platforms. That does not transform a business.  It gives them permission to continue to serve their customer base.

In essence, digitisation is an essential stepping stone to start digital transformation. It makes it much easier to implement if your business is already on board with digital marketing. That’s not to say there’s no place for print, bricks and mortar or outdoors advertising. Digital transformation is about harmonising both.

Let’s look at some examples of digitisation and digital transformation, in a lovely table

It’s always simpler when you can compare the steps. Especially when there’s an aspect of comparison to take into consideration. Salesforce has done just that:

Salesforce digitisation vs digital transformation examples

As you can see, there are plenty of benefits to using digital channels. But, we need to read between the lines. Traditional marketing channels have huge value but their return on investment might not always be as easy to quantify. Harmonising the approach by appreciating the need for both (where applicable) is important. And that is exactly why a tight strategy is essential to implementing this way of working.

A digital transformation strategy

First you need to make sure you have your business and marketing plan <link to marketing plan article> in order. The more thorough your understanding of your business, goals and positioning, the better.

ionology suggests the following five steps are crucial to developing your strategy:

Digital transformation

Has the pandemic affected digitisation?

Absolutely. The pandemic has fast-tracked many businesses to get digital. Whether that’s having meetings and workshops via Zoom or setting up an e-commerce website.

BDO had this gem, which is so very true:

…businesses that had not only developed digital strategies but executed on them prior to the pandemic are now in a position to leapfrog their less nimble competitors. That isn’t to understate the COVID-19-related challenges they now face, irrespective of their current level of digital maturity.  Going digital in and of itself isn’t a panacea to all that ails businesses in the current economic environment. They do, however, have significantly more tools at their disposal to not only weather the storm, but to come out the other side stronger for it.

Are you ready?

Digital transformation is predominantly a company culture shift. So you don’t necessarily need to have all your chickens lined up when you start looking at evolving your business plans. In fact, we’d argue that the right leadership, a positive attitude, willingness to learn and above all, patience is all you need.

Patience is particularly important whenever creating a cultural shift in a company. There will always be team members who are more adaptive when it comes to change. The way to approach this is by explaining the how’s and why’s, so it’s important you present this equipped with the stats and a well planned strategy.

How can we help?

Whether you are looking at digitisation or a digital transformation strategy, let us help you. We are here to support from all capacities. From starting afresh to optimising your existing digital channels. Often an outside perspective is precisely what is needed.

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What does your brands colour palette communicate?

What does your brands colour palette communicate?

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What does your brands colour palette communicate?
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What does your brands colour palette communicate?

When we think about brand design, one of the first things that comes to mind is the use of colour. Sure, monochrome may look sleek, but colour creates depth, emotion and energy. Without that pizazz of a snazzy colour palette, the world would be dull and uniform.

Whether you’re looking at a rebrand, refresh or new brand identity for your business, you’ll come to the table with your own preconceived notions of how you want it to look. And that’s regardless of how creative you are.

A brief psychology of colours

Years of research has gone into the relationship between colour and psychology. However, the connotations of colours and how they influence decision makers is subjective. While some might associate yellow as cowardly, others see it as a marker of confidence.

Here, Ignyte looks at the pros and cons of the core colours. But it’s not until you start thinking about big name brands you associate with each that it comes alive.

The psychology of colour

Let’s stick with our earlier example of yellow. For example, it is often considered a ‘budget’ colour that doesn’t radiate quality. Yet look below and you’ll spot Ferrari, who are an infamous super-car brand, with a mostly yellow logo.

brand colour emotion guide

Brand personality: what are you trying to reflect?

We already know branding is more than just how it looks, it is personality too. And while that is mostly communicated through written content, visuals do play a large part in it.

When you work with a brand designer, they will talk to you about what you want to communicate. This will help create your brand guide, which will encompass a whole identity.

Your brand guide should include the following:

  • An overview of your brand’s past, present and future, its personality and values
  • Your message or mission statement, plus examples of how to apply these
  • Tone of voice with examples of language and keywords to use in campaigns
  • Your logo and how to use it (e.g. on black, white, transparent backgrounds and spacing)
  • Your colour palette
  • Fonts and variations
  • Your buyer personas
  • Visual styles (photography, graphics)
  • Guidelines for social media presence (e.g. use of logo on images, any adaptations to tone of voice/language)
  • Design guides for email
  • Design guides for ads

HelpScout noted: In a study titled “Impact of colour on marketing,” researchers found that up to 90% of snap judgments made about products can be based on colour alone.

Spotlight: Rebranding Basel Area Business & Innovation

Our parent company UP THERE, EVERYWHERE recently worked on a rebranding project for Basel Area Business & Innovation. They are a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to helping businesses succeed in the region.

The focus was to boost awareness, attracting more more companies to come set up there. UP immersed themselves with the stakeholders, businesses in the area and the city itself to appreciate what was on the table. We also joined the project to build the new website.

Through developing an understanding, it became clear that there was always “More to Discover”. A phrase that would become a large part of the key messaging. The brand guide explains why this careful choice of words communicates the area best:

“More” is a key device and one that can be applied to every aspect of the economic activity of the Basel Area. It states simply that you can expect more. It helps reveal the surprising variation that the Basel Area has to offer – in business, culture science, knowledge, arts and environment.

The word “Discover” embodies aspects including expectation/potential/excitement/opportunity. It urges outsiders to look deeper or to look again, and in doing so to see the full potential, that may previously have been masked by existing preconceptions of regional or national characteristics.

Basel’s colour palette and visuals

The primary colours are simple, with a nod to Basel’s heritage. Everything about Basel Area is clean cut, precise and beautiful. The aim to reflect the area and its popularity particularly amongst scientific, innovation and research communities.

The secondary colours not only complement the primary palette, and also the style of photography. This focuses on sky, water, forest, urban areas and business environments.   

Basel colour palette

There are strict visual guidelines: there are to be no night scenes. Imagery should be light, clean, spacious, with blue skies where possible. All symbolising positivity, motivation and success.

basel area homepage

How do I know if my branding resonates with my customers?

There are a number of ways to measure the impact of your branding. We review it from a holistic point of view, carrying out a total audit on all your touch points. This is not only because consistency is crucial for brand recognition and trust, but also because it isn’t limited to one single aspect.

If you are generating leads, converting customers and driving repeat sales, your branding is probably serving its purpose. But you may still want to freshen up.

If you are frequently getting requests for things you don’t do, or website visitors who land with you using queries that don’t make sense, there’s a good chance something isn’t working.

Need help? No problem!

If you’re thinking about refreshing or rebranding your business but aren’t sure where to begin, here is your starting point. Fill out your details below and we will be in touch for a chat.

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What is a marketing plan and why do you need one?

What is a marketing plan and why do you need one?

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What is a marketing plan and why do you need one?

“Good fortune is what happens when opportunity meets with planning.”

– Thomas Edison

Success that comes out of spontaneity is usually down to good luck. Without a clear plan for your business, it’s difficult to know how to build credibility and a customer base. Not only this, it’s knowing how to measure success, what to focus on and your next steps. Enter your business marketing plan.

A marketing plan is a report that outlines your marketing strategy for the coming year, quarter or month. Typically, a marketing plan includes:

  • An overview of your business’s marketing and advertising goals.
  • A description of your business’s current marketing position.
  • A timeline of when tasks within your strategy will be completed.
  • Key performance indicators (KPIs) you will be tracking.
  • A description of your business’s target market and customer needs.

marketing plan on a page template

Can you break it down?

Of course! We’ve combined two simple approaches to build your marketing plan in five steps:

(Credit to the good folks at Smart Insights and Hubspot)

1. Situation analysis – first you must understand customers

As you’ll no doubt know by now, at DPC+UP we go crazy over personas! But this step is a little more in depth than that. It could involve conducting feedback surveys and interviews with your customers.

But it’s important you ask the right questions, in the right way. What do we mean by this? Not saying that there is such thing as a stupid question… but you need to be in touch with how a customer actually thinks. Take this classic example:

How likely are you to recommend Windows 10 meme

Essentially it’s the kinds of questions we recommend when you build your personas. So you want to include:

  • What problems do they all have in common?
  • How do you solve your customers pain points?
  • What motivates them to buy?
  • How do you help them succeed?

If you’re a start-up or are looking at expanding your services to a new sector, it’s worth exploring insights online. Partnering with a market research agency can prove helpful, as this is second nature to them.

2. Situation analysis – marketing audit: where are we now?

Once you understand your customers’ sentiments, it’s time to review the business. This analysis includes industry benchmarks. Look for data on things like average number of employees, earnings, turnover etc. and then looking at where you rank.

It’s also a good opportunity to do a SWOT (strength, weakness, opportunity, threat) analysis on your competitors.

The McKinsey 7S framework of business. Taking a holistic look at the business, thinking about Strategy, Structure, Systems, Staff, Style, Skills and Shared values forms a base for your SWOT.

3. Objectives – sustainable goals: where do we want to go? (SMART)

In case you’re not an acronym whizz kid, SMART objectives stands for:

Specific

Measurable

Achievable (or sometimes agreed)

Realistic (or relevant)

Time based

In essence, these should cover all areas of the business as opposed to focussing on sales. They should combine number driven as well as softer objectives.

In particular, Smart Insights suggests creating SMART objectives such as:

  • The sales forecast; sales figures, number of new clients wanted?
  • Customer service; how can you improve the service to customers?
  • Communication (speak) providing information to clients?
  • Saving time, increasing your business efficiency and reducing costs?
  • The wow factor! Adding sizzle to make your business stand out from the crowd?

4. Analysing your tactics

Here’s where you start to pull things together. You’ve written your goals, you know your target audience and you’re familiarised with the bigger picture (and the detail) of your business. So it’s time to start linking up the puzzle pieces:

Hubspot says:

For example, if your goal is to increase your Instagram followers by 15% in three months, your tactics might include hosting a giveaway, responding to every comment, and posting three times on Instagram per week.

Key business plan and marketing plan elements

5. Setting your budget

Last but no means least, it’s time to look at your budget.

While you’re writing out your tactics, be sure to note an estimated budget. You can include the time it’ll take to complete each tactic in addition to the assets you might need to purchase, such as ad space.

You’ll want to consider costs for marketing activities such as PPC, if you plan to hire an agency, or if you need to refresh your website.

What you discover may surprise you!

You might find that your branding doesn’t resonate with your customers as well as you thought. Or that your website isn’t hitting your targets. Understanding your business holistically is crucial for knowing what areas of your marketing arson needs more attention.

Branding

For example, we recently worked with Grayce on a refresh of their branding. They wanted to  modernise their look and improve their engagement.

grayce mobile optimised website

Find out how we worked with the team at Grayce

Website design

Azets was originally an umbrella company with hundreds of independent accounting firms underneath them. When they decided to rebrand as a single entity in September 2020, they asked us to redesign their website to reflect this. With over 2,500 redirects from the original websites, it was by no means a small task!

Azets website redesign

Read more about what this website redesign entailed.

Brand activation

Before Mum&You launched their subscription service in the UK, they knew they needed outside help to achieve their goals. Through a mix of online advertising, served over Google Adwords, YouTube ads, remarketing and social media ads, we helped set them up for success. Additionally, we built their e-commerce website, allowing them to customise options for their customers such as recommended products.

Mum&You social media advertising

Find out how we worked with Mum&You on their brand launch.

Makes sense, sounds like a LOT of work… do I really need one?

Sure, creating a marketing plan does sound like a lot of time and effort. But having a clear idea of what you want to achieve allows you to understand how to get there, and demonstrates measurable targets.

If you’re not sure you have the time or you need someone to bounce ideas off, partnering with an agency could help. Whether you need more resource or want to delegate a project elsewhere, we will work with you in whatever way helps achieve your goals.

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How to create a social media strategy

How to develop a winning social media strategy

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How to create your social media strategy
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How to develop a winning social media strategy

Without a clear plan in mind, it’s hard to justify the true purpose of what you’re doing. Wow, that’s deep. This mantra (if you will) can be applied to any and all of your marketing activities. Social media shouldn’t be treated as an afterthought when putting together a digital strategy.

Your social media strategy should be part of the early stages to help bring together your overarching marketing and business goals.

We are fanatical about strategy. But what does an effective strategy entail? And, how do you go about creating one that works for you and your brand. Let’s look at this in two steps.

Part one: It’s all about the research

What are your social media goals?

Before you begin with anything, it’s crucial to identify what you want to achieve. Are you looking to build brand awareness? Perhaps drive consideration of your product or services. Or maybe you’re looking to focus on engaging with your community.

Regardless, social media goals should focus on so much more than simply selling. If sales are your only goal, let me tell you now: you’re going nowhere fast! Sure, ultimately you want to convert your social media followers into customers. But there is a lot of groundwork to be done first. You need to build credibility.

What’s your brands personality?

Your brands identity is more than just its look. It is creating a personality through tone of voice, your content and how you engage with others. But your approach on social media is unique compared to corporate guidelines.

While your brand identity is fairly rigid on things like colours, logos and styling, personality must have a degree of flex. It’s important to remember personality is altered for platform. A bit like us, it depends who you’re talking to and where.

…and does that personality translate to social media?

So it’s no surprise that your brand personality will change for social media. Even down to which channels you’re using. Take a look at e-commerce giant, ASOS. They are players in just about every social media channel there is.

Let’s have a look:

LinkedIn – here they focus on the corporate side of things, which is no surprise

ASOS on LinkedIn

ASOS on LinkedIn

Facebook – mostly focuses on memes

ASOS on Facebook

ASOS on Facebook

Instagram – a combination of user generated content, product editorial and memes

ASOS on instagram

ASOS on instagram

Twitter – relatable posts, with a separate account to deal with customer service inquiries

ASOS on twitter

Who are you trying to reach (clue: all about personas)

Your intended audience and your actual audience can be entirely different. If you are already using social media, an analysis of your followers across your active channels will begin to paint a picture of who you are reaching.

If it’s not what you expected, examine what you’ve been doing, your customer base and of course, your personas. If you’re unable to reach your ideal customers, something isn’t working. Whether it’s your approach to your social media, the channels you’re using or if you’ve exhausted all the possibilities, you might want to consider if your branding is due a refresh.

Carry out a SWOT analysis of your competitors

Once you’ve established your goals, your personality and the audience you want to reach, it’s time to have a look at your competitors. Gather a list of up to five brands that you compete with and examine what they’re doing on social media, the channels they use, what’s working and what’s not.

SWOT analysis

Additionally, look for opportunities where you can provide your audience something different and valuable. Is there something your competitors aren’t doing? Or perhaps you can see what they’re trying to do, but you can do better.

Part two: Your social media plan

So, you’ve done your research on your goals, personality and competitors. It’s time to start planning your strategy. Something to keep in mind, regardless of whether you’re new to social media or refreshing your approach, is making sure you can maintain what you’re doing. It’s no good to decide to have a presence across all the platforms if you’re not going to nurture them all. There’s absolutely no shame in a back to basics approach.

Identifying the right social media channels

There are endless social media channels available, with even more launching regularly. We tend to focus on the core favourites: Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram.

This comes in two tiers: the first is reviewing which channels will be best at helping you achieve your strategic goals. For instance, consider the advertising opportunities as well as the organic audience on each.

Next, which channels do your target audience use? Think about demographic data here. Review your personas and see what matches best with them.

How often should you post content?

The age old question. A lot of factors play into how often you should post on social media. Each of the algorithms work differently for one. In fact, posting too often without ‘enough’ engagement can actually hinder your visibility on Facebook in particular. That said, a lot of it is trial and error, much like the time of day, and days of the week you post.

Sendible says:

In reality, there is no magic formula for deciding how often to post on social media.

That’s because what works for one brand, doesn’t work for another. Sure you can read case studies of what has worked for others, but don’t make their solution your solution.

So, instead of seeking magic formulas, let’s focus on these proven posting strategies:

  • Posting consistency is more important than posting frequency.
  • Content quality is more important than content quantity (and social media networks are letting us know with all the changes).
  • Without having an objective for social media, you won’t know if your posts are successful or not.

What are your content pillars?

Once you’ve established all of the above, it’s time to start thinking about your content. You may already have a content marketing strategy in place, in which case, you’ll be following that to an extent. If not, here’s how to choose your content pillars.

Identify your service clusters

Of course you know what you sell, but have you identified the product/service clusters? There are likely to be areas that fit into groups. For example, our clusters are: web, digital and creative.

Once you’ve identified these, it’s time to work through your website. And essentially tag the pages that are most relevant to each.

Planning your social media content and format

The one of the final steps is to think about how you’ll translate your website content into social media content. Keep in mind different lengths of posts serve each channel accordingly. For example, Twitter is famous for its short character limit on posts, whereas Facebook seems limitless in comparison. Sprout Social has a great guide to character limits and the ideal lengths of posts here.

Make sure you have suitable imagery for your posts, as visuals are essential for social media. If you don’t have a lot of owned images, consider stock imagery from places like Unsplash, iStock and other well known websites. You can also develop a user generated content strategy.

If you’re thinking about expanding your library of owned visuals (illustrations, video, animation, photography etc), working with a creative agency is a great option. Harnessing the creativity of a team who works on these kinds of projects day in, day out, can be refreshing and even cost effective, especially in these times.

Creating a social media content calendar

Finally, it’s time to start planning ahead! You can create a content calendar for the next quarter, six months or even the year. Remember, there’s always room for flexibility with digital marketing – that’s the beauty of it!

A content calendar is a great way to help you forward plan what you’ll be sharing ahead of time. Giving you and your cross functional teams notice to prepare what’s required: blogs, visuals, campaigns and so on.

Analyse, learn, adapt!

Ok, we dropped the ball on the content calendar being the ‘final’ step. It’s actually all about reporting. Analyse your social media content, learn from what’s working and what’s not and adapt your plans accordingly.

Keeping things simple, we recommend monitoring your reach, growth, engagement and website traffic from social media.

Need a helping hand?

No shame. We’re always happy to help with your digital marketing projects. Whether you are starting from scratch, refreshing or redesigning your strategy, we’re very much here. Leave your details below and we will be in touch.

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Why we love personas!

Why we love personas!

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Why we love personas!

If you’ve worked with us before, you might have noticed we are obsessed with customer personas. They are a brilliant resource when creating any and all content.  From paid campaigns to blogs to user journeys.

By knowing about your ideal customer you’re in a stronger position to design your brand identity. This informs everything from the colours you use, to tone of voice, your digital focus and so much more.

What information do you need, any why?

You’re building a person. You’ll want to have a think not only about how to interact with your potential customers (e.g. where they hang out online) but the kind of language to use.

The more you know, the easier it is to help. Have a think about the kinds of topics that your customers (and leads) ask you about. This will also help inform your wider content strategy.

Creating your persona

Some of these points will be more or less relevant depending on whether you’re a B2B marketer, or in consumer goods.

What you need:

  • Age group, assumptions on their life stage. (This may be more relevant for consumer goods, where you’ll need to be in tune with their personal needs, such as holidays, children, property etc.)
  • Their location (this will inform content distribution)
  • What’s their professional experience and role (this will help influence what they know/and don’t)
  • What are they interested in?
  • What are their pain points (especially interested in the ones you can solve)
  • Where they spend their time online

Also think about:

  • How they engage with you: do they prefer a phone call, emails or meeting up (hey, remember when that was a thing?)
  • What motivates them to buy? (is up-skilling their team a priority, or making their own life easier and workload lighter)
  • How do they research/how did they find you?
  • What pain points do you solve?
  • Where are their knowledge gaps, or what are the kinds of questions they ask?
  • What makes them tick
  • Are they a decision maker or influencer in the buying process?
  • What turns them off? (too much/not enough information, jargon etc.)

So, is it just made up or does data inform persona creation?

There are three main sources:

Your actual customers and what you notice about them

  • Google Analytics
  • Social media insights
  • You can also use social listening tools, but that’s not necessarily an essential tool here.

Here are some examples of what insights you can look at:

#1 Facebook

Facebook allows you to look at age, gender, location and language. This data is available for your fans, followers, people in your reach and those who have engaged.

The two areas we recommend focussing on are your fans and people engaged. While there will be some crossover, engaged people may not already be fans (or not yet accepted an invite).

Facebook audience demographics

Facebook audience demographics#2 LinkedIn

If you have a LinkedIn business page, the insights show: job function, seniority, industry, company size and location. It’s simple but relevant to the platform.

LinkedIn audience demographicsLinkedIn audience demographicsLinkedIn audience demographics

#3 Google Analytics

You can delve into your website visitors demographics using Google Analytics. There’s a wealth of data in this platform, but some basic areas at a glance:

  • age
  • gender
  • interests
  • industry
  • life stages

Google analytics demographicsGoogle analytics demographics    

If I’m already familiar with this information, why do I need to create a document??

Great question. It’s all well and good knowing this, but what about your team and if you work with any consultants or an agency? Having a persona document not only helps keep everyone in the loop, but it’s an efficient way to do so.

We recommend adding your personas to your brand guide and strategy documents. But it’s also handy to have when working with other teams, internal or external. They’re great for briefing anything design and content related, and for setting up ads.

A non-exhaustive list for when personas are useful:

  • Helping others understand your brands tone of voice
  • Designing (and refreshing) your brand identity
  • Informing content strategy
  • Training your sales team
  • Planning events (well… when that side of life returns!)
  • Planning ads (digital and offline)
  • Which marketing channels to focus on
  • Checking in on performance: are you resonating with your persona?

Short on time?

With all the will in the world, sometimes we simply don’t have the capacity to get things done. We appreciate creating a thorough and effective persona can be time consuming. Whatever the your next big project is, if you’re considering working with an agency, we can factor in persona creation too.

If you’re thinking about your next steps, but aren’t sure where to begin or don’t have the resource, enter your details below and we’ll be in touch.

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What is a user journey and does my website need one?

What is a user journey and does my website really need one?

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What is a user journey and does my website really need one?

When you’re working on a new website, it’s important to consider your user journey. You may hear web developers and designers talk about UX (user experience) but respectfully have no idea what they’re rattling on about. A journey you say…?

First things first: what is a user journey map?

A user journey map is creating during the UX design process of building your website. It can feel like a foreign language, understood only by developers, but if explained it’s not so complex.

It’s all about creating a straightforward, simple process that should in theory generate higher conversions. A website that has a well thought out user journey should understand the intended users, their thought processes, what they want and what they respond best to.

While user journey maps come in all shapes and formats, commonly it is represented as a timeline of all touch points between a user and a product. This timeline contains information about all channels that users use to interact with a product.

Ok, so what does a user journey help solve?

By putting the end-user at the centre of the design, you’re taking your loaded or biased opinions out of the equation. Remember, just because you want a lead to do something in particular, doesn’t mean that’s what they’ll do!

A website user journey is good for:

  • Creating a good user experience. For example, think about e-commerce websites and their filters. It could be as simple as ordering products in price order (e.g. low to high), or being able to show products that are a certain size, colour or have specific features.
  • Solving problems with bounce rates, sessions and pages per session.
  • Solving low conversions. This could be form fills or abandoned shopping carts. By planning this process, you’ll be encouraged to think how many data inputs are really necessary.

And I need one because…

Using a customer journey map to analyse user behaviour helps an organisation understand how their customers travel through the entire sales process and how they feel during their time there.

This approach provides two major benefits:

  • It allows decision-makers to stay focused on customers.
  • It helps make each step of the buying experience easier for potential leads.

You can have the best marketing team, but if your customers aren’t happy, you won’t get anywhere.

In a nutshell, you need a user journey for your website because it helps others understand…

  • What you’re trying to achieve (visually!)
  • Your users behaviour
  • Functionality requirements
  • What pages are necessary on your sitemap

Right, what do I need to do to begin?

Although it’s best to work with a specialist, it doesn’t hurt to be informed on the process. Especially it’s good to know what to expect and come equipped with the information they need (which is particularly good if you’re paying an agency or consultant).

Please note: there may be more than one journey for you to map on your website!

For each user journey it’s vital to understand:

      • Motivation. Why are they trying to do it?
      • Channels. Where interaction takes place
      • Actions. The actual behaviours and steps taken by users.
      • Pain points. What are the challenges users are facing?

Tip: Ensure that the user is getting a consistent experience across all channels.

Some of the steps may include the following:

  1. What’s the scope of the journey?
  2. Who is the user? (consult your persona!)
  3. Define a scenario and your users expectations
  4. List your touch points (e.g. if they are buying a product, can they do this offline, collect in store, get it delivered etc.)
  5. What is the intention of your users? And, what motivates them?
  6. Sketch the journey (or use post-it notes, flowchart planners etc.)
  7. How does it make them feel at each step?
  8. Validate and refine journey

User empathy map

Let us help!

We think it’s excellent that you’re thinking about your website user journey! It’s a great step in making your marketing customer-centric, and should help you to convert more leads to customers going forward. But if web design isn’t your forte, that’s fine, that’s what we’re here for. Simply pop your details on the form below and we’ll be in touch to help.

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SEO v PPC - what should I focus on right now?

SEO v PPC: what should I focus on?

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SEO v PPC: what should I focus on?

SEO v PPC… Which is more important? Ok, actually this is a trick question. You should always have your SEO strategy at the forefront of your marketing activities.

Writing a blog? Consult your keywords and web queries.

Planning some campaigns? Again, look at your keywords.

And yet many of us think of SEO as an afterthought. Or something to fix once in a while, like when your website is redesigned.

This chart from SEMrush is just great. Look at it. It makes it all so simple, right? You can see that while you’ll get quicker, punchier results from running a PPC campaign, working on your PR or keeping an active social media presence, creating regular content that’s informed by a tight SEO strategy is the MVP. It’s the long game sure, but it works.

marketing channels effectiveness over timeSEO is the central nervous system of your website

Think of it like this: without a strong SEO strategy, your website won’t function properly. Sure, it might look nice and you might get the odd bit of traffic. But you might not convert as many leads. You almost definitely won’t be reaching your full potential.

There’s plenty to get your teeth into here. It’s a never ending job in fact. And it’s not just about keyword identification. Oh boy, there’s a LOT of work that goes into your SEO strategy.

SEO can be split into three key areas: on-page, off-page and technical. Some of these tasks will require experts in the field, whereas others you can learn as you go.

You can have a look at our more in-depth SEO best practice guide here. It’ll help you plan your strategy, identify what you need to focus on and hopefully answer your burning questions about SEO.

That said, SEO is just one part of your marketing ecosystem. You can’t just expect to generate leads and convert to customers from SEO alone. Each channel feeds into the bigger picture.

PPC is the cosmetic, go-getting personality!

While we’re still on the body analogy boat, consider PPC like an injection of confidence. It might turn heads, but it needs the groundwork of an optimised website with compelling content to stop traffic.

PPC is an ideal way to bolster your marketing qualified leads (MQLs) by driving more engaged traffic to your website. These spikes in traffic will depend on your campaigns budget, length, quality etc.

However, your campaigns success also relies on the set up of your campaign being done properly. There are demographics to target. Keywords to research and select. Making sure your creative and landing page are both optimised.

In fact, a lot goes into making sure your PPC campaigns are a success. You can read all about best practice for PPC here.

SEO v PPC: A good old fashioned list of pros and cons

Because who doesn’t love a list? And this one’s another belter from SEMrush.

SEO v PPC: pros and cons of each channel

As mentioned at the beginning of this blog, it really depends on what you’ve already been doing. If you’ve laid the groundwork for your website with an excellent SEO strategy and all the green ticks are in place, it’s time to go nuts with PPC. If not, you’re never too late. And if it’s really not your bag, luckily it’s ours.

Next steps…

If this means you’re ready to start running PPC campaigns, your next steps are coming up.

Before we begin, it’s absolutely crucial you’ve got your customer personas in order. While some marketers are satisfied to go ahead without, we at DPC+UP really believe they’re an essential part of the best practice process. After all, if you don’t know who you’re talking to, how can you tailor your campaign to speak to them?

If you choose to work with a digital marketing agency like us, we do the “hard work” identifying the best channels. To achieve this, we look at the following factors of your target audience:
The sites they use
What media they consume
What motivates them to convert

Personas in place, here’s your checklist of what to consider:

#1 What do you want to achieve?

We are firm believers that you must start with your goals before you can plan your campaign. It just makes sense.

#2 What channels are best for you

Once you’ve established your goals and you have researched where your personas “hang out”, it’s time to identify the best channels for your campaign. PPC isn’t restricted to Google, y’know:

  • YouTube
  • Facebook (and Instagram!)
  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Bing

And those are just the well known ones!

#3 What formats lend themselves best to your campaign?

There’s so much to consider. Will you take advantage of multichannel, multimedia campaigns, or will you keep things simple? A PPC specialist will be able to help make recommendations for what formats to incorporate into your campaign. But to give you a toppling idea of what’s available, there’s:

You can read about what they are and when to use them here.

#4 Campaign essentials

While the devil is in the detail, let’s keep things concise here. The next five factors of your campaign will be the cornerstone of its success:

  • Keywords
  • Landing page quality
  • Creative (both visuals and ad copy)
  • Quality score (Google grades this based on your ads relevance, CTR and UX on your landing page)
  • Split ad groups

Don’t have the resource?

Whether its time or expertise you’re running short on, that’s what we’re here for. We pride ourselves on being a friendly extension of your team, rather than a pretentious agency that makes everyone feel inadequate.

If you’re considering your next steps, leave us your details and we’ll be in touch to help. Whether its your SEO strategy, helping run your PPC campaigns or anything else within the digital marketing realm.

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How to write a blog that people will actually want to read!

How to write a blog that people will actually want to read!

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How to write a blog that people will actually want to read!

Ahh blogs. One of those necessary parts of your website that often gets de-prioritised, but helps contribute to your SEO rankings immensely. Not to mention the part it plays in driving web traffic. Whether you’re already at it, using a freelancer or considering the worth of starting (and maintaining) a blog, this one right here is for you!

It can be tricky to know how to get the best out of your content creation efforts. How do you know if you’re covering the “right” topics? How long should they be? Is there a magic formula that makes them even better? Kind of. It’s not a science as such but there are some factors that separate the good from the ugly.

All about personas!

We bloody love a persona here at DPC+UP. Aside from being super helpful to make sure all your sales and marketing teams are aligned on your target market, they’re great for helping you write. Whether that’s email and social media campaigns, ads or web content.

Think about your best customers. How do they behave? What makes them tick? And importantly, how do they engage with you? It’s important to know this, so you know what language to use without alienating one way or another.

Think about:

  • Their job title and their experience
  • How hands on are they?
  • How did they find you? (e.g. Google, social media, trade show, recommendation)
  • Do they read emails, prefer a phone call or are they following your every move on social media?
  • What are their frustrations, and importantly, how do you solve them?
  • What are their key motivators?
  • Are they super professional and only talk necessary business, or have you built a more friendly rapport?

Where to begin: planning your content topics

As always, let’s circle back to the Rosetta Stone of your marketing: your SEO strategy. Consult your keywords. Explore Google Search Console to see what queries drive traffic to your website. If you need a starting point for inspiration, look at what your competitors are doing and also online tools like AnswerThePublic and Google Trends.

This is only part of the planning process though. You’ll also want to think about your service clusters for what you do. If you haven’t yet identified these, have a look at how we recommend planning them.

The anatomy of top performing articles

Here’s where some of the tried-and-tested science comes into play. While a lot of your content success will rely on a combination of planning and distribution, a good chunk also lies in the structure.

This epic infographic from SEMrush covers the top five areas to consider. With the data of over 700,000 articles under their belt and microscope, the findings are certainly worth factoring in next time you hit the keyboard.

The Key Findings

Longreads of 3000+ words get 3x more traffic, 4x more shares, and 3.5x more backlinks than articles of average length (901-1200 words).

Shorter articles (300-900 words) have zero shares 4.5 times more often than long reads of 3000+ words.

Articles with long headlines (14+ words) get 2x more traffic, 2x more shares, and 5x more backlinks than articles with short headlines (7-10 words).

Articles with list headlines (those that start with a number like “N things…”, “N ways…”, etc.) get 2x more traffic and 2x more social shares than other types, followed by guides and “how-to” articles.

36% of articles with H2+H3 tags have higher performance in terms of traffic, shares, and backlinks.

Articles with 5 lists per 500 words compared to articles with no lists get 4x more traffic and 2x more social shares.

The anatomy of top performing articles

And drilling down further into their point made about how content length impacts performance, here’s another visual for you!

Content length: impact on performance

Evergreen content is the MVP

So we’ve covered how to inform your content topics and the anatomy of the ideal blog… but what else should you consider? Evergreen content. Topics that will be around for the long-haul. Good old reliable content that you can reuse, repurpose and not feel overly worried about it becoming horrendously dated.

What is evergreen content?

Think about what is an on-going topic for your industry. For us, it’s how-to and best practice guides for digital marketing. It should answer the age-old questions that don’t hugely change (although it’s good to review and update your evergreen articles when required, as search engines also appreciate that).

For example, compare these two graphs.

#1 How to start a blog

How to start a blog: interest over time

#2 Christmas cake recipe

Christmas cake recipe: interest over time

The How to start a blog graph shows a fairly consistent level of search over time. There aren’t any major spikes or flat-lines. Whereas the Christmas cake recipe spikes and goes flat consistently.

Maximising the value of your evergreen content

Evergreen content is great for many reasons. Let’s examine:

#1 SEO rankings

Of course, one thing that’s always on our mind is Google. It’s the apple of our eye. If you plan with your keywords properly, it should rank competitively in search engines, driving consistent and frequent traffic to your site.

#2 Driving traffic from email and social media

The beauty of using email and social media as drivers for traffic is that you only need a small summary before the link. No one expects (or wants!) to read the entire article on page, the entire purpose it to win that click through (without being considered click bait).

We often recommend when planning for this type of content sharing to pin-point the key take aways. You might want to look at the subheadings within the blog, for ease of example. From there you could easily have around 3 – 5 pulls that you can reuse over time.

#3 It keeps its value

Because you can keep reusing this type of content, it holds its value better. Particularly if it drives quality traffic to your website.

There’s still room for contextual content!

While we do think evergreen content is valuable, we’re all about that ecosystem. And when it comes to blogs, yours should be a good mix of relevant, contextual content (e.g. industry updates, trends and what’s relevant right now) and those reliable evergreen articles.

So you have a blog, what next?

It’s time to distribute! Make sure you are taking advantage of UTM tracking on all links you share, as this will help attribute source, medium and campaign in Google Analytics. Our favourite online tool to build these links easily is the Google Analytics Campaign URL builder.

N.B If you run email marketing campaigns, your provider should already have link tracking set, but it is worth checking!

#1 Social media

It’s more than just copying and pasting a link and hitting share. You need to think about what your post is going to be: what’s the one key take away you want to promote from this blog? (and if there’s more than one, excellent, that means you can share again in a few weeks).

What’s more, make sure you’re taking advantage of things like hashtags (where relevant) and tagging associated contributors or colleagues.

#2 Your lead nurture campaigns

If you’re not yet on the marketing automation bandwagon, here’s some food for thought. If you have an active blog (or are thinking of starting one), building an email funnel is a great way to distribute the content you’re already in the habit of creating.

If this marketing channel is new to you, check out our blog on building a compliant database and our five steps to email marketing success.

Our inbound marketing 101 blog covers off exactly what you need to do to build a successful journey, the types of content to use at each stage of the funnel.

Keep putting your blog on the back burner?

Let’s face it, sometimes there are bigger fish to fry than sitting down to plan and write a couple of thousand words. You know it, and we certainly do. Hell, this is one of the key reasons a digital marketing agency like us exists! So if you need a helping hand planning your content strategy, producing blogs, campaigns and the like, let us know. We will be more than happy to discuss over a (digital) cuppa.

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marketing in a recession

Marketing in a recession

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Marketing in a recession

There’s a lot going on right now. A lot. In fact, let’s not even delve into the shitstorm that has been 2020. There’s a trend of uncertainty, which does make us all feel more conscious of where and how we’re spending our money (professionally and personally). Now more than ever, we’re striving for quality and maximising our budgets.

First things first…

Yes, we all want to get the best possible price, no one wants to be overcharged. But keep in mind that:

good + cheap = slow

good + fast = expensive

fast + cheap = more often than not, crap

good fast cheap

We’re more present, especially online

One minute we’re all at the pub or having a BBQ with family and friends… the next we are cringing at the return of Zoom quizzes, as we strive for any kind of social interaction outside of our own four walls. One thing’s for sure right now: we’re online more than ever before.

While saying “take advantage of it” seems tasteless, it’s true. Your audience are in theory easier to reach than usual. But word to the wise, it’s essential to get your messaging on point. Be sensitive to the current climate and national mood.

The people want guidance!

It’s time to step up and present yourself as a leader in your industry. Your customers want guidance on how they can work smarter, not harder. And marketing is your best way to execute that.

At this time, some businesses are dubious about marketing. You often need to spend money to make money, whether that’s through resource or advertising (or experts that can cover projects out of your remit).

“It may seem like a paradox, but recessionary periods actually provide fertile grounds for marketers to grow their brand’s market share if they’re prepared to think long-term.”

(M. Riston, 2020, Marketing Week)

These are words to live by. We’ve survived recessions before now, and while this one looks a little different, we can make it out of this one too. But to do so, we need to be present, and marketing is how we keep our business present.

Marketing is not a switch; it’s an engine

If you read our blogs, you’ll know we love analogies. They’re great explainers. Here’s a great one for this very situation. Marketing is an engine. It becomes more efficient the more we harness it, and harness it well. If it’s stop-start constantly, it’ll haemorrhage money.

Where to spend and why

Your focal areas will very much depend on what you do already, where your ideal customers tend to discover you, and of course, you budget. So let’s have a look:

Your SEO strategy

Regardless of what you do, as a company and your marketing strategy (or lack thereof), SEO is top of the list of priorities. After all, if you’re not being discovered online, what’s the point?

SEO, or search engine optimisation, in a nutshell is making sure you are visible on Google. It’s a combination of knowing what keywords your website visitors are using to find you, and creating content to answer those queries and build a reputation.

The key to note, is that it’s an ongoing process that includes a mezze of ingredients to cook up a recipe for success (see, I said we love an analogy):

  • content creation (which is a role in itself…)
  • link building
  • an active social media presence (yep, another person to the team)
  • technical stuff like site speed, scripts… (and throw in a developer for good measure)

You get the idea, there’s a lot that goes into it. It can seem daunting if you don’t have a team with the experience in these areas, but that’s where agencies like us can help. Nudge nudge, wink wink.

Whether you want to tackle some of it yourself, or just brush up on your understanding, here are two (hopefully) helpful guides:

#1 A best practice introduction to SEO

#2 How to develop a winning SEO strategy

Content creation

Next up is content creation. And no, you don’t have to be replicating dance videos on TikTok or be an expert in animation to do this (but if that’s your bag, go wild).

Firstly, fresh content feeds into your SEO rankings. Google loves it. Whether that’s creating brand new articles, portfolio pieces etc., or refreshing older pages.

Secondly, good quality content helps position you as a leader in your area of expertise. Talk about what you do, how you can make your customers and leads lives easier, show off how you have remedied your customers woes. You get it.

Your website

It’s no longer the passive shop window to your business. If optimised to it’s full potential, your website can be your best performing salesperson, servicing your business 24/7. But to achieve that, you need to invest resource and budget.

Consider, does you website need a refresh or redesign?

A refresh includes looking at the functionality, user journey, user experience and subtle tweaks where necessary to your branding. This could be through the use of colours, fonts and imagery.

An entire redesign would also look at rebranding. A complete overhaul of your company’s look and feel, messaging, personas, tone of voice. The whole shebang.

Both can feel equally daunting, particularly if you or your stakeholders are attached to how things look at the moment. But it’s important to consider if it’s working for you. Consider:

  • are you generating quality leads?
  • what’s the typical user journey on your website?
  • what keywords are you ranking for, and are they relevant?
  • is anything broken on your website?grayce mobile optimised website

Find out how we helped Grayce refresh their website.

What are you doing with your website leads?

It’s all well and good to get plenty of website visitors, but what happens next?

A well planned out inbound marketing strategy is crucial to converting leads into paying customers. Mapping out the process from website visit through to activation may take some time, but it’s worth doing.

When broken down into steps, you’ll want to identify the following:

  • your ideal customer personas
  • the content channels that they engage best with
  • how to nurture them from prospects to hot leads, ready to convert

What about inbound marketing vs. paid advertising? Both have their pros and cons, and a successful digital marketing strategy will use a balance of the two. For instance, inbound or organic content is a great foundation to building consideration.

Whereas paid (or ads) are great for driving awareness and boosting conversion. They do this by reaching targeted leads who are further down the sales funnel, ready to make a decision.

Mum&You social media advertising facebook

Find out how we helped Mum&You with their digital ad strategy.

Social media

Let’s not forget social media. An extension of your website, focussed on the community that follows it, social media is top of the league when it comes to raising awareness, driving consideration, and boosting engagement. But only when it’s done well.

Again, a strategy is paramount. You’ll need to consider if your tone of voice needs adapting to fit the audience who use that particular channel (think how you might choose to be more professional on LinkedIn vs. the more accepted colloquialisms on Instagram).

It’s so much more than just sticking a few links on Facebook. If you want to be successful, it’s an entire role, filled by an experienced marketeer. You’ll need to understand how algorithms work to maximise organic reach, how to manage a community (think crisis management) and of course, an always on approach.

And that’s not even scratching the surface of what you can achieve if you put budget behind it…

PPC

Last, but by no means least, is PPC (pay per click). Ideal for quick results, paid campaigns give your website visitors a boost by directing highly targeted leads. You can run your ads across a range of platforms including:

  • Google
  • YouTube
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Instagram
  • Bing

…and more!

While it does seem to be a magic wand to generate leads, you need to make sure your marketing ecosystem is healthy. Directing engaged leads who have intention to a website with poor content, broken links and a rubbish journey is a recipe for disaster.

Ultimately, it’s down to your analytics

There’s a great divide between data driven marketers and those who are… well, less excited by numbers, shall we say. Regardless of your stance, it’s absolutely necessary to keep track of performance. Not only because it’s good to have an idea of what’s really going on with your marketing, but also as it helps you to understand what to do to plug the gaps and convert more leads!

Do you need a helping hand?

From time to time we could all do with an extra pair of hands on a project. Whether it’s that you don’t have the expertise, resource or simply enough hours in the day! We can help you. Whether it is content creation, marketing automation, website design, digital advertising, print design… you name it, we’ve got an expert for that!

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