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What does your brands colour palette communicate?

What does your brands colour palette communicate?

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What does your brands colour palette communicate?
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What does your brands colour palette communicate?

When we think about brand design, one of the first things that comes to mind is the use of colour. Sure, monochrome may look sleek, but colour creates depth, emotion and energy. Without that pizazz of a snazzy colour palette, the world would be dull and uniform.

Whether you’re looking at a rebrand, refresh or new brand identity for your business, you’ll come to the table with your own preconceived notions of how you want it to look. And that’s regardless of how creative you are.

A brief psychology of colours

Years of research has gone into the relationship between colour and psychology. However, the connotations of colours and how they influence decision makers is subjective. While some might associate yellow as cowardly, others see it as a marker of confidence.

Here, Ignyte looks at the pros and cons of the core colours. But it’s not until you start thinking about big name brands you associate with each that it comes alive.

The psychology of colour

Let’s stick with our earlier example of yellow. For example, it is often considered a ‘budget’ colour that doesn’t radiate quality. Yet look below and you’ll spot Ferrari, who are an infamous super-car brand, with a mostly yellow logo.

brand colour emotion guide

Brand personality: what are you trying to reflect?

We already know branding is more than just how it looks, it is personality too. And while that is mostly communicated through written content, visuals do play a large part in it.

When you work with a brand designer, they will talk to you about what you want to communicate. This will help create your brand guide, which will encompass a whole identity.

Your brand guide should include the following:

  • An overview of your brand’s past, present and future, its personality and values
  • Your message or mission statement, plus examples of how to apply these
  • Tone of voice with examples of language and keywords to use in campaigns
  • Your logo and how to use it (e.g. on black, white, transparent backgrounds and spacing)
  • Your colour palette
  • Fonts and variations
  • Your buyer personas
  • Visual styles (photography, graphics)
  • Guidelines for social media presence (e.g. use of logo on images, any adaptations to tone of voice/language)
  • Design guides for email
  • Design guides for ads

HelpScout noted: In a study titled “Impact of colour on marketing,” researchers found that up to 90% of snap judgments made about products can be based on colour alone.

Spotlight: Rebranding Basel Area Business & Innovation

Our parent company UP THERE, EVERYWHERE recently worked on a rebranding project for Basel Area Business & Innovation. They are a not-for-profit organisation dedicated to helping businesses succeed in the region.

The focus was to boost awareness, attracting more more companies to come set up there. UP immersed themselves with the stakeholders, businesses in the area and the city itself to appreciate what was on the table. We also joined the project to build the new website.

Through developing an understanding, it became clear that there was always “More to Discover”. A phrase that would become a large part of the key messaging. The brand guide explains why this careful choice of words communicates the area best:

“More” is a key device and one that can be applied to every aspect of the economic activity of the Basel Area. It states simply that you can expect more. It helps reveal the surprising variation that the Basel Area has to offer – in business, culture science, knowledge, arts and environment.

The word “Discover” embodies aspects including expectation/potential/excitement/opportunity. It urges outsiders to look deeper or to look again, and in doing so to see the full potential, that may previously have been masked by existing preconceptions of regional or national characteristics.

Basel’s colour palette and visuals

The primary colours are simple, with a nod to Basel’s heritage. Everything about Basel Area is clean cut, precise and beautiful. The aim to reflect the area and its popularity particularly amongst scientific, innovation and research communities.

The secondary colours not only complement the primary palette, and also the style of photography. This focuses on sky, water, forest, urban areas and business environments.   

Basel colour palette

There are strict visual guidelines: there are to be no night scenes. Imagery should be light, clean, spacious, with blue skies where possible. All symbolising positivity, motivation and success.

basel area homepage

How do I know if my branding resonates with my customers?

There are a number of ways to measure the impact of your branding. We review it from a holistic point of view, carrying out a total audit on all your touch points. This is not only because consistency is crucial for brand recognition and trust, but also because it isn’t limited to one single aspect.

If you are generating leads, converting customers and driving repeat sales, your branding is probably serving its purpose. But you may still want to freshen up.

If you are frequently getting requests for things you don’t do, or website visitors who land with you using queries that don’t make sense, there’s a good chance something isn’t working.

Need help? No problem!

If you’re thinking about refreshing or rebranding your business but aren’t sure where to begin, here is your starting point. Fill out your details below and we will be in touch for a chat.

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Branding graphic designer

Why brand identity isn’t just for consumer goods

By Blog posts, Creative
Branding graphic designer
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Why brand identity isn’t just for consumer goods

In the simplest possible terms, the American Marketing Association describes a brand as “a name, term, design, symbol or feature that identifies one seller from another”. But really it’s so much more than that. A brand exists in the consumer’s mind. It’s an idea, expectation, reputation, experience and a promise all rolled into one.

So, how do we tangibly represent brand identity?

The identity of your brand comes down to this:Paradox Parlours visual tile branding

  • Logo
  • Colour palette
  • Typography
  • Tone of voice
  • Language
  • Visuals: photography or graphic stylings
  • Your unique selling point
  • Use of technology (for example, are you a leader in your industry for using a revolutionary tool)
  • Your company values
  • Your customer promise

And, not forgetting, a brand isn’t only for your customers, but your employees too. It’s no good to be a company with outstanding customer services but one that doesn’t look after and spark joy into its team. So you need to think how you’re looking after them too, what’s the benefit to them? Is it outstanding benefits, uncapped holiday or finishing early on a Friday.

Does that mean branding only exists in the consumer product world?

No. Look at that list again. Any company can become a brand if you can breathe life into it.

B2B or B2C should be B2P: business to people. Regardless if we’re targeted at work or home, we’re still people.

When you’re selling to people, you need to be able to explain your USP (unique selling proposition). It’s what makes you special and sets you apart from your competitors. As a digital marketing agency, we will help you define your USP. We do this by encouraging you to brainstorm:

  • What your customers want
  • What you do well
  • What your competitors do well

That way we can find your sweet spot. Ultimately, your brand is your sales pitch. It plays an important role in creating awareness, education and conversion in your pipelines.

Your brand identity should then be rolled out consistently. In fact, at every point your customers AND your employees interact with your brand.

Consider these questions:

  • Does your website reflect your business accurately?
  • Do all your touchpoints align visually? (e.g. all email signatures, HTML email templates, social media imagery)
  • Do you treat your team the same as your customers?

If you’re not consistent with your brand identity, the trust that you’ve built will fall to the floor. As with individual relationships, that of a brand to people, should also be consistent.

How we worked with Grayce to update their branding

Grayce brand guidelines

Grayce approached us to work on a large digital project which included a brand refresh. Their logo, visuals and tone of voice had become dated. The lack of brand guidelines didn’t translate for attractive campaigns. And worse still, they weren’t appealing to their target audience.

Our brilliant, talented designers developed new concepts and refreshed the branding. The task wasn’t to erase what existed, but modernise it.

An updated logo, colour palette and clarity on how to apply it all for multiple uses were delivered. The Grayce marketing team are now able to create powerful campaigns that get results. And with a consistent brand, they now appeal to the right people with appropriate language.

With a revitalised brand and clear guidelines to boot, the team said they feel empowered and confident to compete with the top players in their industry.

Summary

Any company can become a brand if time and effort goes into the process. A digital marketing agency with brand strategy experience is the ideal starting point if you are not sure where to begin. If you’d like to discuss transformation from a company with a logo, to become a living, breathing brand, leave your details below and we will be in touch.

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